Why Do Cats Pee on Clothes

Why Do Cats Pee on Clothes?

We love our feline friends, but there’s one thing we probably don’t love about them: their pee.

While most of the time our cats will use their litter box, sometimes, for a variety of reasons, cats will urinate in less conventional places.

And unfortunately for us, that often means a great deal of cleaning up. Cat urine is notoriously noxious and a cat who pees outside the litter box can wreak havoc on an otherwise tranquil home.

The odor of cat urine is extremely difficult to get rid of, especially in furniture and other upholstered items. Cats have a tendency to favor warm and soft places to pee, which is why they sometimes pee on furniture no matter how much hard flooring you have in the house.

But why do cats pee on clothes? And perhaps just as importantly, how can we stop them from doing so and clean up if it happens?

In this article we’ll cover the following:

  • Why Do Cats Pee on Clothes?
  • How to Clean Cat Urine

Why Do Cats Pee on Clothes?

If you catch your feline friend urinating on your clothes you may wonder what on earth is going through their mind.

The truth is that there are many reasons why your cat may pee on your clothing. Some of the reasons are related to your cat’s physical health, while others stem from behavioral reasons.

Here are a few of the most common reasons why your cat pees on your clothing:

Your cat is suffering from a medical problem.

Both serious and less serious illnesses can cause your cat to urinate in inappropriate places. In these cases, it’s likely that your clothes were simply the most comfortable place to pee.

You should put your clothes someplace where your cat can’t reach them like a closet, drawers, or in the hamper. Then, take your cat to the vet to rule out any physical issues that may be causing them to urinate on your clothes.

It may be something as simple as a urinary tract infection that will require nothing more than a week of antibiotics, or it could be something as serious as cancer, so the sooner you get them in, the better it will be for everyone.

Your cat is angry with you.

Most cat owners know that cats feel a large range of emotions, just like human beings. If your cat is upset with you, they may express their discontent by urinating on your belongings. Don’t scold your cat, simply put your clothing someplace where your cat can reach.

Try to figure out if there’s something you can do to keep them from peeing out of anger, like introducing them to a new family member the right way, or spending more time with them.

Your cat is marking his or her territory.

This is particularly true for intact male cats, but female cats have been known to mark their territory once and a while, too. Neutering your male cat (which is a good idea anyway) may help curb this.

Your cat doesn’t like their litter box.

There are a variety of different litter boxes on the market. Choosing one that your cat likes is extremely important!

Try out a few different models until you figure out which one your cat prefers. If your cat doesn’t feel comfortable in their litter box they are unlikely to use it. You may also have placed the litter box in an undesirable location. Placing your cat’s litter box in a quiet place is also very important.

You’re using the wrong kitty litter.

If your cat doesn’t like the smell, texture, or consistency of the litter you’ve purchased, they may refuse to use their litter box. Your cat may also be bothered by the dust that the litter produces. If this is the case, try a “low dust” brand such as Worlds Best Cat Litter.

Your cat’s litter box is dirty.

If you haven’t cleaned the litter box in a while, your cat may resort to peeing elsewhere out of necessity. This is one reason you need to clean your cat’s litter box every day.

How To Clean Cat Urine

If your cat has peed on your clothes, the best thing to do is immediately throw them in the washing machine. The longer the urine is allowed to sit on the fabric, the more difficult it will be to remove the stain and the odor.

If you’re using a high-quality detergent, you may be able to get away with simply pretreating the urine stains. Look for detergents with stain fighting properties, such as Persil.

If the stain is old and really set-in, you should try treating the stain with an enzymatic cleaner that is specially formulated to combat the smell of cat urine. Look for a cleaner with enzymes that is specifically designed for cats, such as Natures Miracle Urine Destroyer.

These enzymatic cleaners also work on other types of fabric, such as couches, curtains, carpets, etc.

If your cat pees on your clothes, just hope your cat doesn’t need to pee as much as this kitty does! Wow!

So, why do cats pee on clothes?

Cats will pee on clothes for a variety of reasons. Sometimes your cat is sick and is confused about where to urinate. Other times, they are protesting a dirty litter box or undesirable litter.

Whatever the reason, try to remember that scolding your cat will likely only make the situation worse. You should remove clothing from your cat’s reach which pretty much guarantees that they won’t have the chance to pee on them, and rule out any health issues as soon as possible.

Just in case, you should consider investing in an enzymatic cleaner that is specifically formulated to tackle cat urine, such as Natures Miracle Urine Destroyer.

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Amanda K.

After moving to New York City from Rome, Italy, I began working in the nonprofit world. Despite my day job, my passion has always been animals, especially dogs and cats, and writing. What better way to combine the two? I've been a pet owner for 15 years, and my menagerie includes dogs, cats, hamsters and the occasional hermit crab. My beloved cat, Mozart, who I found as a newborn kitten, sparked my love for felines and is now nearly 15 years old. I am an enthusiastic volunteer at the local ASPCA, where I enjoy spending time with the cats and cleaning up after the dogs. I've been writing about pet ownership and care for the past five years.

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