Can Kittens From The Same Litter Have Different Fathers? - Cat Kingpin
Can kittens from the same litter have a different father

Can Kittens From The Same Litter Have Different Fathers?

What’s more exciting than a new litter of kittens? It’s always fun to wonder what the kittens will look like- more like mom, or more like dad? By the time kittens stop growing, they usually look like one of their parents.

We all know it’s possible for kittens to vary in color, even in the same litter, but have you ever come across a kitten that you just can’t figure out? Maybe your two black cats had an orange kitten, or your two white cats had a tabby.

While cat genetics are varied and fascinating, the answer to these mysteriously colored kittens may be something less complicated: it is entirely possible for kittens from the same litter to have different fathers.

Since this is a relatively common phenomenon with cat owners, we wanted to give you the science behind litters with different dads, and tips on how to prevent it if you’re planning a litter.

In this article, we’ll cover the following;

  • The Science Behind Kitten Paternity
  • How to Prevent It
  • Does This Happen Only With Cats?

The Science Behind Kitten Paternity

When you suspect that your litter of kittens may have mixed paternity, the first thing to consider is your momma cat. Does she have access to the outdoors? Has she been exposed to multiple male cats? If your litter of adorable kittens has more than one father, it’s because the mom let her hormones get the best of her.

In the science world, this phenomenon is called “heteropaternal superfecundation.” Cats, just like most mammals, release ovum (eggs) during their reproductive cycles. If she releases 5 ovum, and a male cat fertilizes all five, then five kittens will be born.

But unlike most mammals, cats don’t release all of their eggs at once. They stagger them, and different eggs may be released at different times. If your female cat releases multiple eggs over the course of a few days, they will be fertilized by whichever male she comes across her during that time.

If she breeds with your cat on Monday, and then with another male cat on Tuesday, the embryos created by these breedings will have different dads. In fact, it’s possible (though unusual) for every single kitten in the litter to have a different father!

Because female cat reproductive cycles last anywhere from 5-20 days, your female cat has plenty of opportunity to seek out multiple males! And she probably can’t help herself. Her body is so inundated with hormones that she will actively seek out a mate (or multiple mates) and these hormones make her absolutely irresistible to male cats.

Every male in a 2-mile radius will be seeking her out. And because instinct is telling your female cat to mate as much as she can, she is unlikely to refuse a potential suitor.

Check out this video of kittens meeting their dad for the first time. This is a good example of kittens not quite looking like either of the parents… Where did their black spots come from, I wonder?

How to Prevent It

Unless you had an intended male cat in mind for breeding, it us unlikely that mixed paternity will bother you. Kittens are cute no matter what, right? But if you want to breed a purebred litter of kittens, making sure your cat only mates with one male is very important!

So, how can you make sure your female cat doesn’t get the wandering eye?

Well, you can’t. If your female cat has access to multiple males, it is very likely that she will make the rounds. The only option is to keep her secluded from every male cat who isn’t her intended partner.

You should make sure she isn’t allowed outside (as there are surely tomcats waiting at your front door for her). If there are multiple intact male cats in the home, you’ll want to keep her completely separated from them for the entirety of her heat cycle, even if that means restricting her to certain areas of the house. Mating in cats occurs very quickly (and often lasts less than a minute) so you won’t have much room to correct a mistake once it’s in the process of being made!

The best course of action is to keep your female cat quarantined, and only give her access to the specific male you’d like her to mate with. And remember, you’ll need to be diligent!

Does This Happen Only With Cats?

Believe it or not, litters fathered by multiple males aren’t as uncommon as you might think. This phenomenon is also relatively common in dogs and other animals that routinely give birth to multiple young at a time.

There have even been documented cases of human heteropaternal superfecundation, though it is extremely rare. Many of these instances happened as a result of human error during in vitro fertilization, in which a human female is accidentally, impregnated using the sperm of two males, resulting in twins with different fathers. However, it can also happen naturally when a woman ovulates while in the early stages of pregnancy, and then a different man fertilizes the second egg.

Conclusion

If faced with an unusual litter of kittens, don’t worry too much. Unless you were purposefully breeding a specific set of cats, multiple fathers really only means multi-colored kittens.

If you have a planned breeding gone awry, here are some steps to make sure it doesn’t happen again:

1. Identify the male cat you’d like to father the litter.

2. Make sure your female cat only has access to this specific male, and keep them together for a few days.

3. Isolate your female cat from all other males for the duration of her cycle, and even longer if you want to be extra safe.

If you’re wondering what happens when a cat gives birth, then click here to find out.

Have questions about kitten paternity and the science behind this fascinating phenomenon? Ask us in the comments!

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Amanda K.

After moving to New York City from Rome, Italy, I began working in the nonprofit world. Despite my day job, my passion has always been animals, especially dogs and cats, and writing. What better way to combine the two? I've been a pet owner for 15 years, and my menagerie includes dogs, cats, hamsters and the occasional hermit crab. My beloved cat, Mozart, who I found as a newborn kitten, sparked my love for felines and is now nearly 15 years old. I am an enthusiastic volunteer at the local ASPCA, where I enjoy spending time with the cats and cleaning up after the dogs. I've been writing about pet ownership and care for the past five years.

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Leave a Comment:

Ashira Rayne says December 6, 2017

My fiance and I have been cat lovers for most of our lives and therefore can’t help but reach out to the strays that come our way. We’ve been caring for the strays where we live here in Georgia for two years now and were somewhat perplexed by the latest round of kittens they produced. It was no surprise to us to have kittens of the same litter from different fathers, but one kitten in particular recently drew our interest to genetic anomaly. Only one male stray, a pale grey tabby, has an abnormally short tail (most likely a manx mix), so we were giddy when we saw that three of the new kittens from two different litters had short tails (as short as two inches). But we also recently lost an older male tabby stray, a dark steel, who had a very distinct orange “spear” in his green eyes and a weakened immune system. So when we gained the trust of the new kittens and realized that one of the short-tailed babies, who we originally thought looked exactly like the pale tabby with the short tail, also had the distinct “spear” in his eyes from the older tabby along with his immunity disorder, it made us wonder how one kitten could have two fathers. I’ve read about “merged twins” such as the famous cat named Venus, who’s face is split down the middle with two very different colors and eye colors. But our baby boy is the same color all over with two identical eyes. It’s just that his color and tail look like his obvious father and his eyes and medical condition mimic another. We’re just looking for answers as to whether a kitten can have two fathers this way without a “twin merge” since none of these traits came from the mother.

Reply
    Melody Cary says March 5, 2018

    It’s possible that the mother was the daughter of one of those males and those genes simply skipped a generation. As far as I know, merged twins is the only way for kittens to have 2 different fathers, and that’s not something that happens very often, so it’s more likely he did get one of those traits from his mother even though it didn’t actually show up in her.

    My kitten is a torbie, mostly white with brown and orange tabby patches, and all of her sisters were some type of calico as well… But both her parents were black and white. The mother, however, had a brown tabby undercoat that you could see in the sun if you looked closely, so even though neither parent looked it, they had the right recessive genes to create a whole litter of calico kittens. In my case, I knew there was only one father because it was at a farm where he was the only male cat around.

    Reply
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